Jessica Pratt | Quiet Signs

 
Quiet Signs by Jessica Pratt

Family Average: 6/7

Sometimes I feel like I was born in the wrong decade. This is not a unique phenomenon, lots of people feel out of place in this day and age. Maybe I’m an old soul, maybe I’m a romantic, maybe I just want to be nude more often —  but holy moly would I love to have been around in the ‘60s. 

Let’s rewind, for a second. Specifically, I think I’d have done well in the mid- ‘60s Laurel Canyon-era when everyone was grooving along in the dust and the wind and having a grand old time. I know, I’m wearing some serious rose-tinted glasses, but it was an era of timeless music — The Mamas and Papas, the Beach Boys, the Byrds…all those crazy kids.

Years later, this album shows up and has me California Dreamin’. Jessica Pratt’s music continues that sepia-hued music’s legacy. Chuck on some flares and go sit in a field. Get ready to be serenaded. 

Look below and see what the family had to say.

 
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This album is stunning. Jessica Pratt transported me into a dreamscape, immersing me into a hazy rumination. With Quiet Signs, Pratt's given a glimpse into her hazy, enigmatic and melancholy world through psychedelic lullabies. Evocative of a bygone era with unique vocals that haunt and charm, it’s completely mesmerizing.

What's most spectacular is the delicacy of Pratt's work. Her playing on that nylon string guitar is exquisite; airy and refined. Carried by reverb, mixed with cycling piano and sparkling flute, the emphasis is on melody and harmony throughout. The songs bleed together into one large, hazy head space, in which the delicate compositions are amplified by the sheer complexity of the arrangements.

Lyrically, it's emotional and intimate, but difficult to glean meaning due to Pratt's more muffled vocals. However, the quieter vocals doesn't negate the power of this lush folk infused chamber-pop. This is the type of music that demands (and deserves) full attention to glean her delicate nuances and subtleties.  

7/7 

 
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“Opening night” hit me right in the face, and made me realize I do not have the vocabulary nor the knowledge to speak of music of this caliber. But I’m going to give you how it made me feel.  This track, which consists of just piano and some aahs for a second, had me not able to stop listening, I wanted to know where we were going, it drew me in.

This album is just an absolutely beautiful piece of music. Different, refreshing, and wow what a talented musician, with depth, profound depth. Such a cool sound. Her voice is otherworldly. She dragged me right into this world that she created and I don’t want to leave. Each song, each sound is just lovely, delightful.

7/7

 
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Gosh darn it feels as though I have been transported to the set of 1988’s Chronicles of Narnia TV series. Don’t quite understand what I mean? That's alright just pop on the video below with the sound off and then turn this album way the heck up. The synergy will be intense. Is that word played out yet? “Synergy” If it is I apologize. Jessica Pratt’s album is a woodland fairy tale. That Is what I was trying to say up there in my other rambling sentences. Fans of enchanting folk artists like Joanna Newsom and David Thomas Broughton rejoice! This album will quench those thirsts for soaring vocals, and quiet guitar strumming/plucking.

There is a very good chance that if you put this album on you will experience levity, twinkling and other strange emotions. Skipping might also occur. Do not worry these are all natural side effects. I had a great time listening to this album. I have said it before when folk music is successful it comes across as earnest. Take my advice friends and pop this diddy on.

6/7 

 
Sean Maldjian